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FSL: Developing Core Values
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truthseeker



Joined: 15 Jun 2006
Posts: 177
Location: NW U.S.

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Own responsibility for your life and circumstance. Fearlessly embrace the current moment and all it contains. Observe dispationately that which your mind conjures. Become familiar with the being you are that doesn't think to know.

I love the developing commentary on self reliance and community. Our small community is moving in that direction as best we are able.
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RedMahna



Joined: 07 Sep 2006
Posts: 1512
Location: USA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ormond's quote:
Quote:
I know how to end the War. NOBODY ENLIST!


I wish that were actually happening... could it be the real reason why our kids do double/ triple time in Iraq? They say it's because we need the best-trained, most experienced. Then why are we getting dead 18 year-olds back? That's not what I call best trained, most experienced.
I call that cannon-fodder, unfortunately. (And I am seeing GOP voter friends becoming dis-heartened, but just shy of publicly disagreeing with Bush, after one of their kids come back in pieces.)

What am I missing?

Sorry, not really the point of this thread. But perhaps the over-all osmosis starting to happen?? People waking up?? Do you get that feeling too?

Red

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RedMahna



Joined: 07 Sep 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi again,
sorry, double-dipping here..
truthseeker said:
Quote:
I love the developing commentary on self reliance and community.


bingo!! and actually can be applied to anything we do.
such as, solution-based instead of exception-based-pass-the-buck mentality.
tiny example:
ever ask a customer service rep or manager of some place a question to which they say, "I have no clue," or give you a short list of excuses along with corporate pronouns of faceless people who have the next available better excuse?
doesn't it seem like this game of zapped brain waves goes on in every fabric of humanity, including the govt, where people don't want to participate in reality? we have been given this script.
i don't recall seeing "Thou Shall Not Think" anywhere, how did it happen?

well, me & you, meaning most BFN-ers, and a lot of us out there, are starting to shake that PROZAC feeling off.

I have a tendency to say to folks like in the scenario above, "That's the American answer, isn't it?"
Each time i use that line, the person at the other end goes into defense-mode momentarily (it's so unpatriotic, how dare he?) - but i think they get it, afterwards... which is fine. I just want them to think, for a change.

Just trying to tweak it as I go along out there in this Brave New World...

Red

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will



Joined: 26 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 11:58 am    Post subject: FSL - Economic Factors and Societal Class Reply with quote

Much like Tom Hayden's discussion some years ago on "economic democracy", I believe he called it, - my liberty - or my ability to freely mobilize myself within that national or global community (of which I am a integral part) is somewhat dependent on my being equitably compensated for the value I generate. To the extent that I am not fully compensated for the value I bring, I am left with fewer resources and hence a lesser ability to maneuver within this economic system.

The value I create can be viewed in two ways. First, I trade within the economy or system and derive value for myself from my labor and know-how. Second, I generate value as a participant in that larger system of divided labor and know-how. Simple put, were it not for this larger design of divided know-how, stored know-how, and applied know-how the efficiencies of our modern civilization would not exist. Further, without our collective participation the wealth and production generated by that larger economic system would not be generated.

Toward that end, the value generated in a "division of labor" or “division of know-how" system is not caused solely by "ownership", but rather by a combination of "ownership" and the system design itself. My point here is that the economic system of divided labor and know-how is itself the machine deserving of substantial credit and compensation for the wealth and value generated by a society. This is not a political statement. It’s essentially an engineering observation. The division of labor design or system “viewed as a whole” is the principal engine responsible for generating value. “Ownership” utilizes the know-how built by the system and stored in the system. In all fairness, when a machine or system is used to generate value that portion of the value caused by the machine should be paid to the machine, and equitably divided by those components or participants in the machine.

In our current system "ownership" utilizes the assets of the division of labor/know-how system to cause production and at times profits. However, that wealth is not appropriately shared with the system that makes “ownership’s” profits possible. Further, “ownership’s” position in the “game” is enhanced as the wealth held by “ownership” enhances its’ ability to maneuver in the system and influence outcomes within the system.

If the role played by the participants in the division of labor/know-how equation was acknowledged and appropriately compensated the distribution of wealth would be more equitable, and hence the societal mobility and influence of the non-ownership classes would more greatly impact on the societal outcomes realized. This then, in my judgment, would, or would have, generate a differently designed civic structure.
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Ormond



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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Core Values are encoded into the language people use. For instance, check out this typical resume language for management.

Quote:
Senior Management - Development Professional
With 20 Years of Accomplishing New Challenges in a Broad Range of Industries
Within Large and Small Businesses

Objective: To develop real estate with a firm that:
1. achieves outstanding growth in a market niche which they dominate
2. creates a very high quality finished product for its target customer



This guy didn't pull that language out of his ass. He learned to talk that way through training in his profession---AND he knows that talking in these terms is expected by personnel directors.

Corporate language is full of this stuff. The language people use every day shapes their mind set. So one method of Full Spectrum Dominance is right under our noses (in our mouths when we speak). They put words in people's mouths and expect them to speak in the terms of dominance.
Yet it only shows the subservience of the manager who uses such language, because it's not his. ( I hope)

Language is a good thing to be aware of the paradigm it shapes.

Navari did a bright thing, by taking Rumsfeld's negative paradigm, and re-charging it positive just by reversing the meaning of the noun.

We can watch for language that promotes dualistic thinking, and change those words and expressions to reflect pluralistic perception.

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will



Joined: 26 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:05 pm    Post subject: FSL - tooling society Reply with quote

The values of a civilization are also played out in the tools (tools- in the broadest sense of the word) we use. Every week thousands of new tools make their way to the patent offices all over the world. The tools that are ultimately put into play are the tools that attract capital. Capital serves itself. Once tools are applied to a civilization it becomes increasingly difficult to apply alternate or competing approaches. The choice of tools essentially “tools” a society – making systems more fixed and rigid. The tools you use define much of how you live. In this culture capital has an inordinate amount or control over the tools which define our practices and cause much of our mode of life.
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navari
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Republic, by definition, has two principle elements:

* First, it is controlled by Law, therefore it does not control Law.

* Second, it recognizes the private independent sovereign nature of each person (man or woman) of competent age and capacity, therefore a
Republic must be representative in its nature.

A Republic recognizes Law is unchangeable, or at least that it can only
be changed by a higher source than government. In a Republic the
concept of “collective sovereignty” cannot exist, except with recognition
that the State or nation, as a body of sovereigns, can speak through one
elected voice; though that one voice can never lawfully interfere with the
private rights of the individual sovereigns.

“A Constitutional Republic” is a government created and controlled, at
least, by the Law of a Constitution. The Constitution of the United States of
America was, in Law, foundationally based on the Bible, the Magna Carta,
and The Declaration of Independence. Those documents recognize man’s
sovereignty, the divine nature of man’s creation and man’s divine right to
Life, Liberty, Property, and the pursuit of happiness.

The Spiritual Is Supreme
Fear of Government-over-Man
Unalienable Rights--From God
Man Organizes Governments To Be His Tools
Limited Government
Decentralized Government
Equal, By God's Gift, in Sight of God and Law
Life and the Pursuit of Happiness
Liberty--Against Government-over-Man
Private Property--Liberty's Support
Taxes--Limited to Safeguard Liberty
The Majority--Limited for Liberty
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Ozregeneration



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 7:15 am    Post subject: The Celestine Insights Reply with quote

Greetings,

Though these aren't directly specifying any core value, I think they provide a useful basic backdrop in regard to the process of how we live our lives. For I see that the synchronistic journey taken by the characters in the book The Celestine Prophecy are the very same journeys that people are beginning to take now, and for some, maybe have been taking for some time. It also may aid some as they contemplate the visions they would like to see in their world.

Quote:

THE FIRST INSIGHT . . . A CRITICAL MASS

A new spiritual awakening is occurring in human culture, an awakening brought about by a critical mass of individuals who experience their lives as a spiritual unfolding, a journey in which we are led forward by mysterious coincidences.

THE SECOND INSIGHT . . . THE LONGER NOW

This awakening represents the creation of a new, more complete worldview, which replaces a five-hundred-year-old preoccupation with secular survival and comfort. While this technological preoccupation was an important step, our awakening to life's coincidences is opening us up to the real purpose of human life on this planet, and the real nature of our universe.

THE THIRD INSIGHT . . . A MATTER OF ENERGY

We now experience that we live not in a material universe, but in a universe of dynamic energy. Everything extant is a field of sacred energy that we can sense and intuit. Moreover, we humans can project our energy by focusing our attention in the desired direction...where attention goes, energy flows...influencing other energy systems and increasing the pace of coincidences in our lives.

THE FOURTH INSIGHT . . . THE STRUGGLE FOR POWER

Too often humans cut themselves off from the greater source of this energy and so feel weak and insecure. To gain energy we tend to manipulate or force others to give us attention and thus energy. When we successfully dominate others in this way, we feel more powerful, but they are left weakened and often fight back. Competition for scarce, human energy is the cause of all conflict between people.

THE FIFTH INSIGHT . . . THE MESSAGE OF THE MYSTICS

Insecurity and violence ends when we experience an inner connection with divine energy within, a connection described by mystics of all traditions. A sense of lightness--buoyancy--along with the constant sensation of love are measures of this connection. If these measures are present, the connection is real. If not, it is only pretended.

THE SIXTH INSIGHT . . . CLEARING THE PAST

The more we stay connected, the more we are acutely aware of those times when we lose connection, usually when we are under stress. In these times, we can see our own particular way of stealing energy from others. Once our manipulations are brought to personal awareness, our connection becomes more constant and we can discover our own growth path in life, and our spiritual mission--the personal way we can contribute to the world.

THE SEVENTH INSIGHT . . . ENGAGING THE FLOW

Knowing our personal mission further enhances the flow of mysterious coincidences as we are guided toward our destinies. First we have a question; then dreams, daydreams, and intuitions lead us towards the answers, which usually are synchronistically provided by the wisdom of another human being.

THE EIGHTH INSIGHT . . . THE INTERPERSONAL ETHIC

We can increase the frequency of guiding coincidences by uplifting every person that comes into our lives. Care must be taken not to lose our inner connection in romantic relationships. Uplifting others is especially effective in groups where each member can feel energy of all the others. With children it is extremely important for their early security and growth. By seeing the beauty in every face, we lift others into their wisest self, and increase the chances of hearing a synchronistic message.

THE NINTH INSIGHT . . . THE EMERGING CULTURE

As we all evolve toward the best completion of our spiritual missions, the technological means of survival will be fully automated as humans focus instead on synchronistic growth. Such growth will move humans into higher energy states, ultimately transforming our bodies into spiritual form and uniting this dimension of existence with the after-life dimension, ending the cycle of birth and death.

THE TENTH INSIGHT . . . HOLDING THE VISION

The Tenth Insight is the realization that throughout history human beings have been unconsciously struggling to implement this lived spirituality on Earth. Each of us comes here on assignment, and as we pull this understanding into consciousness, we can remember a fuller birth vision of what we wanted to accomplish with our lives. Further we can remember a common world vision of how we will all work together to create a new spiritual culture. We know that our challenge is to hold this vision with intention and prayer everyday.

THE ELEVENTH INSIGHT . . . EXTENDING PRAYER FIELDS

The Eleventh Insight is the precise method through which we hold the vision. For centuries, religious scriptures, poems, and philosophies have pointed to a latent power of mind within all of us that mysteriously helps to affect what occurs in the future. It has been called faith power, positive thinking, and the power of prayer. We are now taking this power seriously enough to bring a fuller knowledge of it into public awareness. We are finding that this prayer power is a field of intention, which moves out from us and can be extended and strengthened, especially when we connect with others in a common vision. This is the power through which we hold the vision of a spiritual world and build the energy in ourselves and in others to make this vision a reality.

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Nat



Joined: 15 Sep 2006
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Location: minime-rica

PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2007 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FSL long term durability...and the living/learning/reproducing balance


FSL long term durability

taking a very long term view for the continuation of FSL once established - in the face of apparent victory over these bastards, we will, by necessity, have to set up a method by which the currently accruing (and following) history is NEVER forgotten, and most vitally NEVER corrupted, like say, the bible, which has been prone to rewrites and re interpretations

we must assume that they will try to re-emerge over decades, centuries or even millenia

with the likes of the web we can maintain the historical record...as long as history is controlled in many hands instead of a few, then we should be okay...so one of the main core values may be that we need to make sure control of everything is distributed and not centralised - decentralised everything

having many independent digital copies, unlike crumbling paper, should preserve things...we should perhaps consider this record as being akin to a precious 'birthright' to be carefully protected, maintained and passed on intact, ad infinitum

for many of our ancestors, history has been made corruptible by the knowledge of the written word being in the hands of the few, and the wrong few, not accessible and open to cross reference by all

this, unlike the many still existing native tribespeople who overcome that by BEING the history bearers...we can do the same

by definition, FSL is about knowledge in the hands of the [too] many

too many independent copies in too many hands for the powers that wannabe to morph things their way

the teaching of history needs to be handed down in a distributed, non centrally controlled manner, as well...otherwise, it is susceptible to corruption...every point in the chain must be disaggregated

another point is that unlike previous records, the very decentralised nature - and the effective indestructibility of digital data (it may corrupt but it is not required to be rewritten) should result in the meaning (and language) remaining unchanged through time, therefore the meaning of the written/filmed/audio histories should remain accessible and understood to future generations, even though language will continue to evolve, the record should remain in effect pristine and easily understood because this history will become a linguistic and literary 'anchor'...so one might imagine that as already occurs with most languages to some degree, there is 'proper' dialect (one grounded in these historical records) and then there's the constantly evolving one we use and modify on a daily basis (innit)

with such sheer variety of audiovisual media the subtleties of language, the nuances in the face of the speaker and so on will assist in the preservation of the meaning of words, which will also bolster the incorruptibility of the record

also key is the use of OPTICAL media as data 'lifeboats', as carefully stored optical media (stored in darkness and away from temperature extremes - as an aside i have immersed cds in water and frozen them to see the negative effects, and there were none [not even in the oft slightly delaminated centre of the disk where top and bottom are frequently not completely laminated together], not that i'd necessarily recommend freezing as a manner of storage) has a long life expectancy, and optical media is safe from electromagnetic pulse corruption and destruction (good to know at any time now or the future)

taking it to the (slightly absurd but logical) extreme: wealthy persons could buy hundreds of optical drive equipped laptops and multi fuel generators and store them in humidity free farraday cage storage...just incase the electromagnetic pulse retribution for emerging resistance comes...like i say, perhaps overdoing it...certainly, keeping a reserve machine in farraday cage boxes might be a thought for individuals with that particular concern


the living/learning/reproducing balance

a simple example of dissemination and disaggregation is that we don't want one publisher creating all the text books for our children...then they can manipulate

you don't want one group giving the curricula to all the teachers, also leads to centralised control

having said that, wider cross referencing of curricula and history (with true checks and balances against clique forming and influence/perversion) with broader society is surely essential, to prevent things going the other way, no need or desire for small community strength to emerge as a new tribalism

it is probably safe to assume that those same checks and balances are contained within this post...all take responsibility for knowledge, it is in the hands of all, deferral and delegation are anathema to FSL

perhaps the essential value - bottom line - is that certain core functions within the public domain must stay within the local, neighbourhood, level in terms of ultimate control

the way i see it, a world where any person has the wherewithal to teach is a world worth creating...to my mind it is entirely possible for a person, by the age of around thirty to have such a breadth of knowledge, that they could teach most subjects at least at the level of most current teachers - or to treat most medical conditions with more alacrity than most general practitioners do this day

i found the education system to be one massive struggle when younger, too much fun and living to be done for all those lessons...this will not be the case for all, some will choose to learn whilst younger, but in my opinion, education is like the act of breathing, it is not something to be considered to be limited or constrained to one part of a person's life, it should be something embraced as an ongoing life project

assuming the young might be freed of the shackles of the imposition of tightly, oppressively structured education, there opens up the opportunity for those at the end of their teens to get into the act of reproduction if they so choose, without "ruining your life...you've ruined your life...you've ruined your education...you'll never get a job with corpocorp now...no-one will employ a pregnant woman...you'll never get on the career ladder with kids" etc...if education is set free to roam through a persons entire life, without stigma attached, then so much the better

naturally, basics of language - of reading-writing, basics of mathematics (not that complicated de-genuising shite) and social skills are fundamental at a young age, but without the other bullshit inherent in education at 'school age', i think that these three cores of personal success would be simply passed on to most by the age of ten, no biggie

school as it currently exists has all the appearance of being designed as a force of de-education and indoctrination into the 7 to 9 (9 to 5 died long ago)

i am imagining a world where the Grandmother and Grandfather are as natural parents to the grandchild as the parents themselves, or perhaps even a 'generation gap' kind of raising of children, where the generation above the parent might take the role of parenting and raising the child...none of this is intended as dogma or doctrine, just putting the thought out there, it's more of a rediscovering of the ancient successful ways of all our pasts than some variation on Logan's Run

in a world where psyop fuelled polarisation and inter generational wars and gender battles no longer exist, the above can be a successful and peaceful existence



knowledge as a living being...not fossilised


knowledge in the hands of the [too] many


Last edited by Nat on Sun Apr 22, 2007 7:49 pm; edited 6 times in total
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navari
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recently found the Natural Economic Order. Silvio's discussion
of FREE-MONEY, OR MONEY AS IT SHOULD BE could be very applicable to
FSL.
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Ozregeneration



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 485
Location: Big Island Down Under

PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greetings Matt,

Great ideas regarding storage and dissemination.

matt wrote:

...wider cross referencing of curricula and history (with true checks and balances against clique forming and influence/perversion) with broader society is surely essential, to prevent things going the other way, no need or desire for small community strength to emerge as a new tribalism

it is probably safe to assume that those same checks and balances are contained within this post...all take responsibility for knowledge, it is in the hands of all, deferral and delegation are anathema to FSL

perhaps the essential value - bottom line - is that certain core functions within the public domain must stay within the local, neighbourhood, level in terms of ultimate control

the way i see it, a world where any person has the wherewithal to teach is a world worth creating...to my mind it is entirely possible for a person, by the age of around thirty to have such a breadth of knowledge, that they could teach most subjects at least at the level of most current teachers - or to treat most medical conditions with more alacrity than most general practitioners do this day

And the most important thing to teach the children would be how to learn not what to learn.
matt wrote:
i found the education system to be one massive struggle when younger, too much fun and living to be done for all those lessons...this will not be the case for all, some will choose to learn whilst younger, but in my opinion, education is like the act of breathing, it is not something to be considered to be limited or constrained to one part of a person's life, it should be something embraced as an ongoing life project

Yes, once they are taught how to breathe (deep into the belly and not shallow into the chest). Smile
matt wrote:
naturally, basics of language - of reading-writing, basics of mathematics (not that complicated de-genuising shite) and social skills are fundamental at a young age, but without the other bullshit inherent in education at 'school age', i think the these three cores of personal success would be simply passed on to most by the age of ten, no biggie

They could also explore the statement I Am Sufficient throughout their school years. The statement, not being a rule, but something that a child would explore and give feedback based on their own Inner knowing. (Just had to put it in) Wink
matt wrote:
school as it currently exists has all the appearance of being designed as a force of de-education and indoctrination into the 7 to 9 (9 to 5 died long ago)

From cradle to grave I think they call it.

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Fintan
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 9:55 pm    Post subject: Modern Education: The Murder Machine Reply with quote

Clearly, education is a vital area for Full Spectrum Liberty.
Rather than a lot of personal suggestions, I thought I would
post the ideas in this treatise below.


Written at the turn of the last century, this is as vital an essay
as if penned in recent times. This is a shortened version of the
original, which I have lightly revised to a more modern parlance,
otherwise these are the original words of an enlightened educator.

Quote:
Modern Education:
The Murder Machine


By Patrick H. Pearse
Teacher, Irish Revolutionary Leader.

Modern Edit by Fintan Dunne


First of freedom. The word freedom is no longer understood. We have almost lost our conception of the idea. So completely is this true that the very organisations which exist to champion freedom show no disposition themselves to accord freedom; they challenge a great tyranny, but they erect their little tyrannies.

Surely the first essential of healthy life is freedom. But there has been and there is no freedom in modern education; no freedom for the child, no freedom for the teacher, no freedom for the school: a sheer denial of the right of the individual to grow in his own natural way; bound hand and foot, chained mind and soul, constricted morally, mentally, and physically with the involuted folds of rules and regulations, its programmes, its minutes, its reports and special reports, its pains and penalties.

Every school must conform to a type---and what a type!

Every individual must conform to a type---and what a type!

Our common parlance has become impressed with the conception of education as some sort of manufacturing process. Our children are the `raw material'; educated by `modern methods' which must be efficient but cheap; we send them to university to be `finished'; when finished they are `turned out'; specialists `grind' them for the Civil Service and the professions; not forgetting the debris ejected by the machine as either too hard or too soft to be moulded to the pattern required.

It is cold and mechanical, like the ruthlessness of an immensely powerful engine.

A machine vast, complicated, with a multitude of far-reaching arms, with many ponderous presses, carrying out mysterious and long-drawn processes of shaping and moulding, is the true image of the modern education system.

It grinds night and day; it obeys immutable and predetermined laws; it is as devoid of understanding, of sympathy, of imagination, as is any other piece of machinery that performs an appointed task. Into it is fed all the raw human material; it seizes upon it inexorably and rends and compresses and re-moulds; and what it cannot refashion after the regulation pattern it ejects with all likeness of its former self crushed from it, a bruised and shapeless thing, thereafter accounted waste.

Modern education systems are elaborate pieces of machinery devised by highly-salaried officials for the purpose of turning out citizens according to certain approved patterns. The modern school is a State-controlled institution designed to produce workers for the State. We speak of the `efficiency', the `cheapness', and the `up-to-dateness' of an education system just as we speak of the `efficiency', the `cheapness', and the `up-to-dateness' of a system of manufacturing gas.


We have an elaborate machinery for teaching persons certain subjects, and the teaching is done more or less efficiently. We have some thousands of buildings, large and small. We have an army of inspectors. We have a host of teachers, mostly underpaid. We have a Compulsory Education Act. We have the grave and bulky code of education. But we have, I repeat, no education system; and only in isolated places have we any education. The essentials are lacking.

There is involved a primary blunder as to the nature and functions of education. For education has not to do with the manufacture of things, but with fostering the growth of things. And the conditions we should strive to bring about in our education system are not the conditions favourable to rapid and cheap manufacture, but the conditions favourable to the growth of living organisms---the liberty and the light and the gladness of a ploughed field under the spring sunshine.

The teacher in practice is not yet at liberty, to seek to discover the individual bents of his pupils, the hidden talent that is in every normal soul, to discover and to cherish. I knew one boy of whom his father said to me: `He is no good at books, he is no good at work; he is good at nothing but playing a tin whistle. What am I to do with him'? I shocked the worthy man by replying (though really it was the obvious thing to reply): `Buy a tin whistle for him'.

The idea of a compulsory programme imposed by an external authority upon every child in every school in a country is the direct contrary of the root idea involved in education. Yet this is what we have in Ireland. In theory the primary schools have a certain amount of freedom; in practice they have none. At the present moment there are thousands of boys and girls pounding at a programme drawn up for them by certain persons around a table. Precisely the same textbooks in every secondary school and college, will constitute the whole literary pabulum of secondary schools. `Stick to your programme' is the strange device on the banner of the system; and the programme bulks so large that there is no room for education.

The first thing I plead for, therefore, is freedom: freedom for each school to shape its own programme in conformity with the circumstances of the school as to place, size, personnel, and so on; freedom again for the individual teacher to impart something of his own personality to his work, to bring his own peculiar gifts to the services of his pupils, to be, in short, a teacher, a master, one having an intimate and permanent relationship with his pupils, and not a mere part of the educational machine, a mere cog in the wheel; freedom finally for the individual pupil and scope for his development within the school and within the system.

And I would promote this idea of freedom by the very organisation of the school itself, giving a certain autonomy not only to the school, but to the particular parts of the school: to the staff, of course, but also to the pupils, and, in a large school, to the various sub-divisions of the pupils. I do not plead for anarchy. I plead for freedom within the law, for liberty, not licence, for that true freedom which can exist only where there is discipline, which exists in fact because each, valuing his own freedom, respects also the freedom of others.

The school must make such an appeal to the pupil as shall resound throughout his after life, urging him always to be his best self, never his second-best self. Such an inspiration will come from science and art if taught by people who are really scientists and artists, and not merely persons with certificates.

Inspiration must come from the teacher. If we can no longer send the children to the heroes and seers and scholars to be fostered, we can at least bring some of the heroes and seers and scholars to the schools. We can rise up against the system which tolerates as teachers the rejected of all other professions rather than demanding for so priest-like an office the highest souls and noblest intellects of the race.

I remember once going into a schoolroom in Belgium and finding an old man talking quietly and beautifully about literature to a silent class of boys; I was told that he was one of the most distinguished of contemporary Flemish poets. Here was the sort of personality, the sort of influence, one ought to see in a schoolroom. Not, indeed, that every poet would make a good schoolmaster, or every schoolmaster a good poet.

I put it that what education needs is less a reconstruction of its machinery than a regeneration in spirit. The machinery, I said, has doubtless its defects, but what is chiefly wrong with it is that it is mere machinery, a lifeless thing without a soul. A soulless thing cannot teach; but it can destroy. A machine cannot make men; but it can break men.

Most of the educators detest the programme. They are like the adherents of a dead creed who continue to mumble formulas and to make obeisance before an idol which they have found out to be a spurious divinity.

In particular I would urge that the school system of the future should give freedom---freedom to the individual school, freedom to the individual teacher, freedom as far as may be to the individual pupil. Without freedom there can be no right growth; and education is properly the fostering of the right growth of a personality. Our school system must bring, too, some gallant inspiration. And with the inspiration it must bring a certain hardening. One scarcely knows whether modern sentimentalism or modern utilitarianism is the more sure sign of modern decadence.

AN IDEAL IN EDUCATION

To the old Irish the teacher was aite, `fosterer', the pupil was dalta, `foster-child', the system was aiteachas, `fosterage'.

And is it not the precise aim of education to `foster'? Not to indoctrinate, to conduct through a course of studies (though these be the dictionary meanings of the word), but first and last to `foster' the elements of character native to a soul, to help to bring these to their full perfection rather than to implant exotic excellences.

We cannot think of a school without its Master. A school in fact, according to the conception of our wise ancestors, was less a place than a little group of persons, a teacher and his pupils: where the master went the disciples followed. That gracious conception was the conception of Europe all through the Middle Ages. Philosophy was not crammed out of text-books, but was learned at the knee of some great philosopher: Art was learned in the studio of some master- artist, a craft in the workshop of some master-craftsman. Always it was the personality of the master that made the school, never the State that built it of brick and mortar, drew up a code of rules to govern it, and sent hirelings into it to carry out its decrees.

It is not merely that the old Irish had a good education system; they had the best and noblest that has ever been known among men. There has never been any human institution more adequate to its purpose than that which, in pagan times, produced Cuchulainn and the Boy-Corps of Eamhain Macha and, in Christian times, produced Enda and the companions of his solitude in Aran. The old Irish system, pagan and Christian, possessed in pre-eminent degree the thing most needful in education: an adequate inspiration.

Colmcille suggested what that inspiration was when he said, `If I die it shall be from the excess of the love that I bear the Gael'. A love and a service so excessive as to annihilate all thought of self, a recognition that one must give all, must be willing always to make the ultimate sacrifice; this is the inspiration alike of the story of Cuchulainn and of the story of Colmcille, the inspiration that made the one a hero and the other a saint.

We are too fond of clapping ourselves upon the back because we live in modern times, and we preen ourselves quite ridiculously (and unnecessarily) on our modern progress. There is, of course, such a thing as modern progress, but it has been won at how great a cost! And in some directions we have progressed not at all, or we have progressed in a circle; perhaps, indeed, all progress on this planet, and on every planet, is a circle, just as every line you draw on a globe is a circle or part of one.

Modern speculation is often a mere groping where ancient men saw clearly. All the problems with which we strive (I mean all the really important problems) were long ago solved by our ancestors, only their solutions have been forgotten. Mankind, I repeat, or some section of mankind, has solved all its main problems somewhere and at some time. The solutions are there, and it is because we fail in clearness of vision or in boldness of heart or in singleness of purpose that we cannot find them.

MASTER AND DISCIPLES

In the Middle Ages there were no State art schools, no State technical schools: as I have said, it was always the individual inspiring, guiding, fostering other individuals; never the State usurping the place of father or fosterer, aiming at turning out all men and women according to regulation patterns.

In Ireland the older and truer conception was never lost sight of. It persisted into Christian times when a Kieran or an Enda or a Colmcille gathered his little group of foster-children (the old word was still used) around him. It seems to me that there has been nothing nobler in the history of education than this development of the old Irish plan of fosterage under a Christian rule, when to the pagan ideals of strength and truth there were added the Christian ideals of love and humility. And this, remember, was not the education system of an aristocracy, but the education system of a people. It was more democratic than any education system in the world to-day. Our very divisions into primary, secondary, and university crystallise a snobbishness partly intellectual and partly social. At Clonard, Kieran, the son of a carpenter, sat in the same class as Colmcille, the son of a king.

And so it was all through Irish history. A great poet or a great scholar had his foster-children who lived at his house or fared with him through the country. The hedge schoolmasters of the nineteenth century were the last repositories of a high tradition. I dwell on the importance of the personal element in education. I would have every child not merely a unit in a school attendance, but in some intimate personal way the pupil of a teacher, or, to use more expressive words, the disciple of a master.

And here I contradict another position of mine, that the main object in education is to help the child to be his own true and best self. What the teacher should bring to his pupil is not a set of ready made opinions, or a stock of cut-and-dry information, but an inspiration and an example; and his main qualification should be, not such an overmastering will as shall impose itself upon all weaker wills that come under its influence, but rather so infectious an enthusiasm as shall kindle new enthusiasm.

The Montessori system, so admirable in many ways, would seem at first sight to attach insufficient importance to the function of the teacher in the schoolroom. But this is not really so. True, it would make the spontaneous efforts of the children the main motive power, as against the dominating will of the teacher which is the main motive power in the ordinary schoolroom. But the teacher must be there always to inspire, to foster.

The native Irish education system possessed pre-eminently two characteristics: first, freedom for the individual, and, secondly, an adequate inspiration. Without these two things you cannot have education, no matter how you may elaborate educational machinery, no matter how you may multiply educational programmes.

WHEN WE ARE FREE

In these chapters I have sufficiently indicated the general spirit in which I would have Irish education re-created. I say little of organisation, of mere machinery. That is the least important part of the subject.

The function of the central authority should be to co-ordinate, to maintain a standard, to advise, to inspire, to keep the teachers in touch with educational thought in other lands. I would transfer the centre of gravity of the system from the education office to the teachers; the teachers in fact would be the system. Teachers, and not clerks, would henceforth conduct the education of the country.

I need hardly say that the present system must be abolished. Good men will curse it in its passing. It is the most evil thing that Ireland has ever known. Dr. Hyde once finely described

Death and the nightmare Death-in-Life
That thicks men's blood with cold.

Of the two Death-in-Life is the more hideous. It is sleeker than, but equally as obscene as, its fellow-fiend. The thing has damned more souls than the Drink. Down with it---down among the dead men! Let it promote competitive examinations in the under-world, if it will.

Well-trained and well-paid teachers, well-equipped and beautiful schools, and a fund at the disposal of each school to enable it to award its own tests based on its own programme---these would be among the characteristics of a new system. And the internal organisation: little child-republics, with their own laws and leaders, their fostering of individualities, yet never at the expense of the common wealth, their care for the body as well as for the mind.

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