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Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs are a Fire Hazard
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RockDock



Joined: 07 Feb 2007
Posts: 366

PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 8:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Continuity wrote:
You can get 6400K CFL lamps - they're mainly made for the Far East where they apparently prefer that kind of colour temperature to light their buildings with - the only problem is that it tends to make Caucasian skin tones look bloodless and corpse-like. Wink


Yes, I want to look ghoulish.

I shall wait for my LED miracle lights. Smile

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Continuity



Joined: 16 Jul 2006
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Location: Municipal Flat Block 18A, Linear North

PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2008 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have used CFLs for years, since they first appeared on the market, from the £15-each expensive-component ballasted ones right through to the present 75p-each cheapo-ballasted ones, and have never - ever - come across this 'burning plastic' phenomenon. Ever.

I like to use the 11W ones in table lamps, bedside lamps, that kind of thing, and the 20W (& sometimes the rarer 24W+ ones) in room fixtures etc. - they provide plenty of light, IMO.

The days when they would take minutes to 'warm up' and produce a ghastly shade of light are looong gone. Wink

As for the mercury thing - we have used the old-fashioned linear flouro tubes for donkey's years, and they operate on exactly the same basic tech, and there hasn't been the same sort of outcry and concern about those...

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RockDock



Joined: 07 Feb 2007
Posts: 366

PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2008 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have tried CFLs in the past few years, but really don't like them. They don't work in my unheated garage between November and March when it can be as cold as -40ºC for days at a time. Actually they don't work very well when the temperature goes below about -20ºC (around 0ºF). I tried them in the bathroom, but my wife didn't like the ghoulish tones on the reflection in the mirror, and have tried them in other rooms as well.

I still don't like them, and doubt I ever will.

Oh yeah, also tried them in the laundry room too, but since my basement ceiling is low and my head is high, found that I would bump my head on the bulb and break them. More than once. So, out they go.

My LED Christmas lights work great. Apart from their ugliness.

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RockDock



Joined: 07 Feb 2007
Posts: 366

PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2008 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Besides all that, the bloody bulbs are being mandated by the government. Due to my contrariness I can't go along with that! Mind you, I might be better off if I switch now and start hoarding bulbs since expectations are that prices will rise as the incandescent ban gets closer to reality.
http://preview.tinyurl.com/3euv4u (tinyurl Preview of article below - prolly won't be there very long)
Quote:

Light bulb rules may push prices up
By Jack Branswell and Mike ReidCanwest News Service
OTTAWA — Canadians could pay more for light bulbs and may not even have access to certain types of lights because of a worldwide shortage when new national light bulb efficiency standards come into effect in 2012.

In documents obtained through Access to Information, those issues were raised by the lighting industry with the government because of Canada’s push to phase out inefficient light bulbs by 2012.

The government and the lighting industry had a summit in Toronto last June and documents out of that meeting and follow-up meetings show there is still concern about some of the details of how inefficient light bulbs — typically incandescents — will be replaced and at what cost.

In one document, government consultants said they assume price and supply will not be affected, but a government notation in the margin says “manufacturers are telling us that with the global push to go to CFLs (compact fluorescent lights), there would be a shortage of material and final products so prices may go up. Hard to say to what extent though.”

Wayne Edwards, the vice-president of the Electrical Equipment Manufacturer Association of Canada, said it is likely prices will increase after 2012.

“For sure. Electronics that go into the ballast (the base) in CFLs can be and are in short supply. Some lamps may be in very short supply and may not be available.”

Government notes from the lighting summit also have comments from industry participants: “There is a shortage of raw material to produce CFLs today (phosphor, etc.).” Another part of the document states that “global supply may be an issue if many jurisdictions attempt to implement similar standards at the same time. This problem could be compounded if (due to longer lifetimes for bulbs) the long-term demand is lower than initial demand,” a document noted.

Natural Resources Canada (NRC), which is the department leading the phase-out program, is aware that because Canada, the U.S., the EU and other countries are all trying to phrase out inefficient bulbs around the same time frame, it may have an effect on product availability and prices.

“We’ve heard it and we’re concerned enough to try to get enough international work on it to see if it is going to be an issue,” said John Cockburn, senior chief of energy efficiency standards with NRC.

Last September, Edward’s association sent NRC a letter saying the government’s timeline to phase out the bulbs doesn’t allow the industry enough time to retool plants, create new products and production lines.

“Our members are saying this still cannot be done,” he added. “We continue to point out to the powers (that be) that we hear you but we don’t think it will be done for all these various reasons. . . . This is like asking the car manufacturers to have every car be a hybrid by 2012. It is exactly the same scenario.”

The U.S. adopted a federal energy bill last December which also phases out traditional incandescent light bulbs between 2012 and 2014. Cockburn said that law should help manufacturers meet the Canadian market demand, because the standards will be very similar. The Canadian lighting industry had been very concerned that without international harmonization on lighting standards, Canada, a relatively small market, might have trouble getting producers to create lights to this country’s standards.

_________________
There are souls in the boots
Of the soldiers America
Fuck your yellow ribbon
If you want to
Support your troops
Bring them home
And hold them tight
When they get here
-Andrea Gibson - For Eli
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Continuity



Joined: 16 Jul 2006
Posts: 1716
Location: Municipal Flat Block 18A, Linear North

PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2008 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that more of an effect on electricity consumption, in the UK at least, is the effects of the new policy of replacing all the old, super-efficient, orangey Low Pressure Sodium (LPS) streetlights with newer High Pressure Sodium (HPS) and Metal Halide (MH) lights.

Not only are the astronomers (rightly) up in arms about this, as the older LPS lights were monochromatic, and it was easy to filter out the light from them, and the newer lights are far more broadband in their light spectra, making them virtually impossible to filter out - but the newer HPS and MH lights are *far* less efficient than the older LPS ones.

When you multiply the extra juice being used by these newer streetlights by the millions of them across the whole of the UK, the extra amount of electricity being used by them must add up to a truly *staggering* amount... Shocked

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