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Target Africa: Pentagon to Create 'AfricaCom'; G8 Move In
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Jerry Fletcher



Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 837
Location: Studio BS

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even Global Warming has got Africa in the cross hairs.

Apparently only global corporate 'investment' can save the doomed desert nation - and that ain't gonna happen with them terr'ists galavanting around.

I guess the best way to save Africa would be to bomb the shit out of it, then set up a permanent military occupation to beat down any survivors.

'Saved' Iraq, didn't it?

Quote:
The century of drought
One third of the planet will be desert by the year 2100, say climate experts in the most dire warning yet of the effects of global warming

[...]

The results are regarded as most valid at the global level, but the clear implication is that the parts of the world already stricken by drought, such as Africa, will be the places where the projected increase will have the most severe effects.

The study, by Eleanor Burke and two Hadley Centre colleagues, models how a measure of drought known as the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) is likely to increase globally during the coming century with predicted changes in rainfall and heat around the world because of climate change. It shows the PDSI figure for moderate drought, currently at 25 per cent of the Earth's surface, rising to 50 per cent by 2100, the figure for severe drought, currently at about 8 per cent, rising to 40 cent, and the figure for extreme drought, currently 3 per cent, rising to 30 per cent.

[...]

Senior Met Office scientists are sensitive about the study, funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, stressing it contains uncertainties: there is only one climate model involved, one future scenario for emissions of greenhouse gases (a moderate-to-high one) and one drought index.

[...]

The number of food emergencies in Africa each year has almost tripled since the 1980s. Across sub-Saharan Africa, one in three people is under-nourished. Poor governance has played a part.

Pastoralist communities suffer most, rather than farmers and urban dwellers. Nomadic herders will walk for weeks to find a water hole or riverbed. As resources dwindle, fighting between tribes over scarce resources becomes common.

One of the most critical issues is under-investment in pastoralist areas. Here, roads are rare, schools and hospitals almost non-existent.

[...]

Nomadic herders in Turkana, northern Kenya, who saw their cattle die last year, are making adjustments to their way of life. When charities offerednew cattle, they said no. Instead, they asked for donkeys and camels - animals more likely to survive hard times.

Pastoralists have little other than their animals to rely on. But projects which provide them with money to buy food elsewhere have proved effective, in the short term at least.

From:
http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article1786829.ece


It is in the long term, however, where these 'pastoralists' are consistently screwed.

'Pastoralists?' WTF?

Are these native tribesmen or f*cking landscape artists?
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Fintan
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Joined: 18 Jan 2006
Posts: 8531

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 4:29 pm    Post subject: Chilling Africa Reply with quote

LOL ROTFLMAO!

All this does bring home how long-term is the plan for Africa.

It was back in 1984 that they launched the AIDS thing
--targetted squarely at Africa.

Demoralizing the Continent's population and rendering them 'dependent'.

While painting Africa as a vast "failed state" in the eyes of the world.

Chilling.
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Jerry Fletcher



Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 837
Location: Studio BS

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awww shit.

Quote:

Somali militia declares jihad against Ethiopia
The Associated Press

Published: October 9, 2006



MOGADISHU, Somalia Ethiopian troops briefly entered a strategic hilltop town in Somalia Monday alongside government fighters, residents and Islamic militia said, and Somalia's radical Islamic forces declared a holy war against Ethiopia.
 
"I urge all the Somali people to wage holy war against the Ethiopians," said top Islamic leader Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed, wearing combat fatigues and holding aloft an AK47 assault rifle. "We need action rather than words," he told a brief news conference in Mogadishu, the capital his forces hold.
 
He also put the Islamic forces on full alert. "Ethiopian troops have intentionally invaded our land," Sheik Sharif said. "We will counter them soon."
 
Sheik Yusuf Indahaadde, the national security chairman for the Islamic group, also called for holy war and claimed at the same news conference that 35,000 Ethiopian troops were on Somali soil, but did not give any further details. Foreign observers, however, have put the number in the hundreds.
 
"This is a declaration of war," Indahaadde said. "We will not wait any more. we will defend the integrity of our land."
 
The Islamic courts have declared holy war against Ethiopia on a number of occasions in recent months, but have so far avoided any direct military confrontation.
 
While Somalia's weak but internationally recognized government publicly denies it is being supported by Ethiopian troops, government officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, say about 6,000 Ethiopian troops are in Somalia.
 
The government is increasingly challenged by the hardline Islamic fighters, who oppose all outside intervention, particularly from Ethiopia, Somali's traditional rival.
 
The head of a militia allied to the Islamic movement said three Ethiopian battalions totaling 750 men alongside government militia rode into Bur Haqaba Monday morning without a shot being fired. Mohamed Ibrahim Bilial said his militiamen retreated as the Ethiopians entered.
 
Bur Haqaba is 60 kilometers (37 miles) east of Baidoa, the only town the government controls. It is perched along six hill tops, allowing forces there to control the only road from Mogadishu, which the Islamic movement controls, and Baidoa, 250 kilometers (150 miles) away. It was taken over by Islamic forces in late June.
 
"We will recapture the town," Bilial told The Associated Press.
 
The Ethiopian and government forces later withdrew from Bur Haqaba and reassembled at a military camp 20 kilometers (12 miles) east of Baidoa, residents said.
 
Ethiopian officials have denied involvement in Somalia - though diplomats, journalists and Somalis have seen their troops in the country. Ethiopians were seen patrolling Baidoa in 11 armored vehicles mounted with anti-aircraft guns Monday.
 
The reports from Bur Haqaba Monday prompted another denial.
 
"Any accusations about Ethiopian troops inside Somalia is false," said Solomon Abebe, a spokesman for Ethiopia's Foreign Affairs Ministry.
 
Mohamed Abdi Hussein, the pro-government governor of Bur Haqaba who fled to Baidoa in June when it fell, told the AP no Ethiopian troops had been involved in the recapture of the pro-Islamist town. He urged locals to remain calm.
 
Somali government officials, speaking separately on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media, accused the Islamic group of spreading the claim Ethiopian forces were involved in a bid to heighten tensions.
 
"I saw government troops and a number of Ethiopian troops," said taxi driver Salad Ali Mohamed, a Bur Haqaba resident. "Some militiamen loyal to the government joined them when they entered the town but the remainder loyal to the Islamic courts left."
 
Somalia has not had an effective national government since 1991, when warlords overthrew dictator Mohammed Siad Barre and then turned on one another, throwing the country into anarchy.
 
The transitional government was formed in 2004 with U.N. help in hopes of restoring order after years of lawlessness. But it has struggled to assert authority, while the Islamic movement seized the capital, Mogadishu, in June and now controls much of the south.
 
The Islamic group's strict and often severe interpretation of Islam raises memories of Afghanistan's Taliban, which was ousted by a U.S.-led campaign for harboring Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaida fighters.
 
The United States has accused Somalia's Islamic group of sheltering suspects in the 1998 al-Qaida bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. Bin Laden has said Somalia is a battleground in his war on the West.

From:
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2006/10/09/africa/AF_GEN_Somalia.php



Unfortunately, predictable as it is ruthless.
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obeylittle



Joined: 10 Sep 2006
Posts: 442
Location: Middle o' Mitten, Michigan Corp. division of United States of America Corp. division of Global Corp.

PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2006 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another example of the control and abuse of corporate Africa (and more):

Quote:
Initiative Seeks to Improve Life in Nigeria's Troubled Oil-Rich Delta
By Gilbert da Costa
Abuja
23 October 2006

Tensions in Nigeria's oil-rich Niger Delta have flared in recent months as local communities accuse foreign oil companies and the government of reneging on promises to provide jobs and social amenities. Gilbert da Costa in Abuja reports for VOA on a new initiative that seeks to create opportunities and improve living conditions in the long-neglected region.

The Niger Delta, which provides all of Nigeria's crude oil, has a long history of militants attacks and kidnappings at oil facilities.

Violence in the delta, a wetland region, is rooted in poverty, corruption and lawlessness. Most of the inhabitants have seen few benefits from five decades of oil extraction that has damaged the environment.

President Olusegun Obasanjo, while endorsing a new U.S.-led initiative to improve living conditions in the delta, acknowledged that corruption had blighted the oil-rich region.

"Even when money was made available either to regional development boards or even to the government, a lot of it went into corruption, and what needs to be done was not done," he said. "I hope now that we are becoming partners, we will be watching one another. I f we jointly put money, I will make sure you do not spend it the way you should not spend it. And we are getting people from the private sector, from outside who would say, government put in your money. If you put one billion [Naira], you will then not say to us that a contract that is worth 50 million [Naira], you will give it away for 50 million."

Most of the delta's people have no access to clean drinking water or regular sources of electricity.

The U.S. Agency for International Development in partnership with the Dutch-based Shell Oil company and the Bayelsa state government hope to address some of the region's long-standing economic grievances under a multi-million-dollar initiative. The initial phase of the project estimated at $50 million, involves cassava production and processing, aquaculture, and improvement in health delivery.

Shell Oil is Nigeria's largest oil producer, and it accounts for almost half of the OPEC-member nation's daily crude output.

Shell's deputy chief executive in Nigeria, Mark Corner, says the company is willing to commit more funds to social and economic programs in the Niger Delta and appealed for a more conducive environment for its operations.

"It is an obligation of our company, and other oil companies generally as good corporate citizens, to make sure we are putting something back in the communities, in terms of social and economic development," he said. "We are committed to do that, but we need help. We are experts in oil-and-gas production, we are not experts in social development, health, education etc. So, the concept of partnership is one which is fully supported by us."

Critics say that activities of oil companies in Nigeria have been a major contributor to the poverty and deprivation endemic in the region. President Obasanjo wants oil companies to provide more resources to help in addressing the delta's development challenges.

"The oil companies are ready to spend millions of dollars for public relations in Europe, in America," he said. "This is where the problem is, this is where the problem is ... You employ lobbyists and things there, this is where you need to spend the money. You said though you are not in the business of social development, but you are not in the business of public relations either. All that money you are spending on public relations, come and spend it here. You spend money advertising there, this is where the problem is."

A U.S.-based company has also reached a partnership with three Nigerian banks to provide $2.5 billion in mortgage financing for Bayelsa.

Analysts say the new Niger Delta initiative offers the delta its best chance of a turning point, especially given the direct involvement of foreign partners like USAID.

An ethnic Ijaw child carries a jerry can to waterfront in village of Okerenkoko in southern Nigeria's Niger Delta (file photo)
An ethnic Ijaw child carries a jerry can to waterfront in village of Okerenkoko in Niger Delta (file photo)
The poverty-stricken region has seen millions of dollars provided for its physical development pocketed by corrupt officials.

A representative of the USAID, Patricia Fleuret, says the U.S. government is committed to the programs that will bring a better future to the region and reduce tensions.

"I came not just for USAID, but also representing the World Bank and DFID [British Department for International Development] to congratulate you on your Bayelsa Partnership Initiative," she said. "It is a strategy that we hope to see replicated around the country and we hope to support throughout. We also like to say, I come with the full authority of the U.S. government to say that we will continue to look for ways to support your initiatives. Anything we can do to further assist you, we will."

As the demand for the delta's oil-and-gas resources becomes greater, it is expected that other major world powers will take a more critical interest in the long-term development of the Niger Delta.
Link


And from the same website it seems that the UN Envoy to Sudan has been expelled for moonlighting as a blogger. err... just being his honest self.
UN Envoy to Sudan Heads to New York After Expulsion

-----

And on another (related?) topic we have this seemingly sudden media embrace of Senator Barack Obama of Illinois, as possible Democrat candidate for president in 2008. It was the media remember, who painted Obama as a "progressive" hero and got him "elected" in 2004. This puts Obama elbow-to-elbow alongside Hillary for the democrat nomination... A couple articles here:
First black US president? Obama the man to watch
Kenya: U.S. Media Tips Obama for White House in 2008

I know all about Obama and I am not exclusive in the knowledge that Obama is a CIA plant. Many know this, perhaps many of you too suspect Obama, particularly after his junior-management role in the 2004 election--opposite John Conyers in damage-management for the blacks and "progressive liberals". Many have been waiting just as I these past two years to see just what role Obama will play for the Ruler. Well now it is becoming clearer...

A Hillary vs. Obama primary certainly makes more sense than an Al Gore or John Kerry gig no? Think about it. The Democrat primary winner then teams with the loser to become the President/Vice-President ticket for Democrats. Obviously, the Republican ticket is a moot point here because as we all know, the Republicans are in self-destruct mode by design. Now consider the magic...

The media will continue, stepping it up in its present role, applying the wax, glitter and polish to this CIA Kenyon, Obama. The blacks and minorities in AmeriCanExico will be pysop'ed into supporting this "Real Goddam African" black man right along with the white populations' Hillary beautification project. Hell the blacks and minorities can't wait to "get the vote out" for "their man"!

Hillary gets her needed boost, or free ride, her legitimacy really. The blacks and minorities are manipulated once again at the ballot box, but this time, THEIR MAN (and woman) WINS! Whether he is slated to be captain or co-captain matters not at this early point. What matters now is the media's success in polishing this pair of dildos up for the 2008 ignoramous' orgasmic orgy at the ballot box. (hand me a cigarette Laughing )

Just think, a real goddam African stud in the White House alongside queen Hillary... The African G8/Global agenda never looked so goddam delicious! And Soooo doable! It's dripping with intrigue... with drama. Tension! Excitement! So sexy and irresistible this forbidden fruit..?
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Jerry Fletcher



Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 837
Location: Studio BS

PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2006 2:46 pm    Post subject: Obamarama! Reply with quote

obeylittle wrote:
Another example of the control and abuse of corporate Africa (and more):


The Imperialist Dinner Theater rolls on; every few months there's a whole new show, but the menu never changes.

That article is another classic example of nefarious spinning of the African Invasion as 'social responsibility'.

Supposedly this article is about the fantastic $50 million initiative designed to 'improve' the poverty stricken conditions of the 'oil rich region', right?

Quote:

The Niger Delta, which provides all of Nigeria's crude oil, has a long history of militants attacks and kidnappings at oil facilities.

Violence in the delta, a wetland region, is rooted in poverty, corruption and lawlessness. Most of the inhabitants have seen few benefits from five decades of oil extraction that has damaged the environment.

President Olusegun Obasanjo, while endorsing a new U.S.-led initiative to improve living conditions in the delta, acknowledged that corruption had blighted the oil-rich region.

[...]

Most of the delta's people have no access to clean drinking water or regular sources of electricity.


Hmmm. What kind of access is available for the delta's PERSONS?

There seems to be no shortage of electricity to power corporate activity like oil extraction and corruption. Just not enough to waste on extravagances like cooking or heat for those lazy 'pastoralists'.

Quote:

The U.S. Agency for International Development in partnership with the Dutch-based Shell Oil company and the Bayelsa state government hope to address some of the region's long-standing economic grievances under a multi-million-dollar initiative. The initial phase of the project estimated at $50 million, involves cassava production and processing, aquaculture, and improvement in health delivery.


Quote:

Cassava
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

[...]

In the humid and sub-humid areas of tropical Africa, cassava is either a primary staple food or a secondary co-staple. In West Africa, particularly in Nigeria, cassava is commonly prepared as Eba or Garri. The cassava is grated, pressed, fermented and fried then mixed with boiling water to form a thick paste. In Liberia the cassava root is pounded, mixed with boiling water to form a thick paste and cooked as Fufu. People economically forced to depend on cassava risk chronic poisoning diseases, such as tropical ataxic neuropathy (TAN), or such malnutrition diseases as kwashiorkor and endemic goitre.


Yum.
Thanks Shell, that $50 mill ought to cook up a lotta tasty Fufu.

But what's this?
Quote:

A U.S.-based company has also reached a partnership with three Nigerian banks to provide $2.5 billion in mortgage financing for Bayelsa.


Uh, where'd that come from? Which US based company is this, and what sort of banking 'partnership' just 'provided' 2.5 BILLION? That's a lot of cassava! I believe 'providing mortgage financing' is another way of saying this 'partnership' just purchased the blighted Bayelsa, and will now be expecting timely mortgage payments from the hungry 'pastoralists'.

Three guesses where that 50 mill is gonna go.

Quote:
I know all about Obama and I am not exclusive in the knowledge that Obama is a CIA plant. Many know this, perhaps many of you too suspect Obama, particularly after his junior-management role in the 2004 election--opposite John Conyers in damage-management for the blacks and "progressive liberals". Many have been waiting just as I these past two years to see just what role Obama will play for the Ruler. Well now it is becoming clearer...


What on earth are you talking about? Wink



Nuclear 'Rogues', American 'Heroes', and Afro E. Newman for President. Genius.

Quote:
The media will continue, stepping it up in its present role, applying the wax, glitter and polish to this CIA Kenyon, Obama. The blacks and minorities in AmeriCanExico will be pysop'ed into supporting this "Real Goddam African" black man right along with the white populations' Hillary beautification project. Hell the blacks and minorities can't wait to "get the vote out" for "their man"!

Hillary gets her needed boost, or free ride, her legitimacy really. The blacks and minorities are manipulated once again at the ballot box, but this time, THEIR MAN (and woman) WINS! Whether he is slated to be captain or co-captain matters not at this early point. What matters now is the media's success in polishing this pair of dildos up for the 2008 ignoramous' orgasmic orgy at the ballot box. (hand me a cigarette )


Yes! No! Don't! Stop! Oh! Don't stop, don't stop..!!

Quote:
Just think, a real goddam African stud in the White House alongside queen Hillary... The African G8/Global agenda never looked so goddam delicious! And Soooo doable! It's dripping with intrigue... with drama. Tension! Excitement! So sexy and irresistible this forbidden fruit..?


Oh Yesss!!
Mmmm...

*puff puff*

That was good.

*puff puff*

Thanks obey -

*puff puff*
Wink
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Fintan
Site Admin


Joined: 18 Jan 2006
Posts: 8531

PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2006 8:42 pm    Post subject: Home Run Reply with quote



I think you hit a home run there dudes.
This is a very interesting angle....

....computing...... BRB. Wink
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Jerry Fletcher



Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 837
Location: Studio BS

PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2006 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I think you hit a home run there dudes.


I must give credit to my batting coach, who taught me how to recognize the curve ball.

He's the one with the schnaz over there 'backstabbing' the 'truth movement'. Wink

Anywhoo - getting back to the controlled demolition of Africa, it appears Global Warming is edging out poverty as the number one reason to 'save' Africa with corporate development.

If we don't, you see, the continent will simply go 'up in smoke'.
Quote:




Report warns over climate change
Press Association 
Sunday October 29, 2006 3:03 AM


Africa will go "up in smoke" unless the international community acts to curb climate change, a report has warned.

A coalition of the UK's leading development and environment agencies says that global warming is already having a serious impact on Africa and will get much worse unless urgent action is taken now.

The report is released in the run-up to the next major United Nations Conference on climate change in Nairobi and the publication of the Treasury's Stern review on the economics of the problem.

"Africa - Up in Smoke 2" is based on the latest available scientific research and evidence from those living on the front line of global warming.

Africa is already warmer by 0.5 degrees Centigrade than it was 100 years ago, which is putting more strain on water resources. According to the Hadley Centre, temperature increases over many areas of Africa will be double the global average increase, and drought patterns stand to worsen catastrophically.

The coalition calls for rich countries to make good their promises to reduce greenhouse gases made at Kyoto and go beyond them. It also calls for an overhaul of humanitarian relief and development; for donors to fund urgent measures to help communities adapt to a new and more erratic climate; and for donors and African governments to tackle poverty and invest in agricultural development.

Africa is the continent probably most vulnerable to climate change and the one that faces the greatest challenges to adapt. For millions of people in the Horn and East Africa, the success or failure of rains due over the next two months will be critical. Whether the rains fall will determine if 2007 will offer the prospect of recovery from the serious drought of 2005-06 or will be another year of desperate struggle to survive.

Although the climates of Africa have always been erratic, the latest scientific research, together with the on-the-ground experience of the agencies themselves, indicates new and dangerous extremes, continual warming and more unpredictable weather patterns. The success or failure of one rainy season, or even several, cannot be attributed to global warming.

The report quotes the experience of ordinary African people and catalogues the impact of rising temperatures, more frequent and severe droughts in some places, more torrential rains in others and greater climatic uncertainty for the continent's farmers.

Climatic unpredictability increases the pressure on people's lives and livelihoods from poverty, HIV/AIDS and government neglect. Women and rural societies are under the greatest pressure.

© Copyright Press Association Ltd 2006, All Rights Reserved.


From:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uklatest/story/0,,-6177916,00.html


How long until Tommy Chong is OXFAM's official spokesperson? "C,mon Africa, just chill out man..."

As I watch this story light up the electronic newsglobe today, I begin to understand the psyop appeal of the 'Sunday Times'. I guess this is more of a 'personal interest' story than a 'business' item.

Also explains why they dumbed down the title of their 'report' as far as culturally possible. Caught my eye though, didn't it? Wink

Oh yes, there's more... and more and more. This 'crisis' is awfully important to somebody's agenda.

Quote:

Climate change 'hitting Africa'


Climate change is already affecting people across Africa and will wipe out efforts to tackle
poverty there unless urgent action is taken, a report says.


Droughts are getting worse and climate uncertainty is growing, the research from a coalition of UK aid agencies and environmental groups says.

Climate change is an "unprecedented" threat to food security, it says. It calls for a "climate-proof" model of development and massive emissions cuts to avoid "possibly cataclysmic change".

The report, Up In Smoke 2, updates previous research from the organisations - Oxfam, the New Economics Foundation and the Working Group on Climate Change and Development, an umbrella group of aid and green groups.

It says that although climates across Africa have always been erratic, scientific research and the experience of the contributing groups "indicates new and dangerous extremes".

Arid or semi-arid areas in northern, western, eastern and parts of southern Africa are becoming drier, while equatorial Africa and other parts of southern Africa are getting wetter, the report says.

The continent is, on average, 0.5C warmer than it was 100 years ago, but temperatures have risen much higher in some areas - such as a part of Kenya which has become 3.5C hotter in the past 20 years, the agencies report.

Andrew Simms, from the New Economics Foundation, said: "Global warming is set to make many of the problems which Africa already deals with, much, much worse," he said.

"In the last year alone, 25 million people in Sub-Saharan Africa have faced food crisis.

"Global warming means that that many dry areas are going to get drier and wet areas are going to get wetter. They are going to be caught between the devil of drought and the deep blue seas of floods."

He added that the "great tragedy" was that Africa had played virtually no role in global warming, a problem he said was caused by economic activity of the rich, industrial countries.

Mr Simms said unless climate change was tackled all the "best efforts" to help Africa could come to nothing.

One of the biggest threats is growing climate unpredictability, which makes subsistence farming difficult, the report says. The average number of food emergencies in Africa per year almost tripled since the mid 1980s, it points out. But it says that better planning to reduce the risk from disasters, together with developing agricultural practices that can withstand changing climates, have been shown to work and could help mitigate the impact if used be more widely.

'Overwhelming'

Up in Smoke 2 also laments the failure of industrialised governments to help developing countries adapt to climate change.

Between $10bn (£5.2bn) and $40bn is needed annually, the report says, but industrialised countries have given only $43m - a tenth of the amount they have pledged - while rich country fossil fuel subsidies total $73bn a year.

The agencies say that greenhouse emissions cuts of 60% - 90% will ultimately be needed - way beyond the targets set in the Kyoto agreement.

"Climate change is overwhelming the situation in Africa... unless we take genuine steps now to reduce our emissions, people in the developed world will be condemning millions to hunger, starvation and death," said Tony Juniper, executive director of Friends of the Earth.

The report comes two weeks before a key summit on climate change in Nairobi, where delegates will look at the progress made on the Kyoto agreement that requires industrial nations to cut their emissions by an average of 5.2% from 1990 levels by the period 2008-2012.

Delegates will also consider what system should be adopted when the current period ends.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/africa/6092564.stm

Published: 2006/10/28 23:44:57 GMT


From:
http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/mpapps/pagetools/print/news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6092564.stm


Quote:
Report's stark warning on climate Analysis
By Robert Peston
Business Editor, BBC News


Power firms have to cut emissions by 60-70%, the report says
The Stern Review says that climate change represents the greatest and widest-ranging market failure ever seen. And on the basis of this intellectually rigorous and thorough report, it is hard to disagree.

Sir Nicholas Stern, a distinguished development economist and former chief economist at the World Bank, is not a man given to hyperbole.


Hyperbole? Maybe not. Blatant lying on behalf of his imperialistic, ruthless, global cancer of a 'former' employer? Without a doubt.

Quote:

Yet he says "our actions over the coming few decades could create risks of major disruption to economic and social activity, later in this century and in the next, on a scale similar to those associated with the great wars and the economic depression of the first half of the 20th Century".
His report gives prescriptions for how to minimise this economic and social disruption.

His central argument is that spending large sums of money now on measures to reduce carbon emissions will bring dividends on a colossal scale. It would be wholly irrational, therefore, not to spend this money.


Unless the 'report' is wholly bullshit.
Quote:

However, he warns that we are too late to prevent any deleterious consequences from climate change.

The prospects are worst for Africa and developing countries, so the richer nations must provide them with financial and technological help to prepare and adapt.

From:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/6096594.stm


And that would be in the form of, uh, lemme guess, uh... loans from the World Bank?

I wonder if that will have any effect on taxes, or gas prices, or stuff like that?

Quote:

Act on green taxes now or the world will pay terrible price

GERRI PEEV - POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT (gpeev@scotsman.com)
• Tax plans to hit the environmentally unfriendly are leaked
• Less flying and smaller cars to form part of assistance to the planet
• Other parties go along with plans more or less
Key quote "Our actions over the coming few decades could create risks of major disruption to economic and social activity, later in this century and in the next, on a scale similar to those associated with the great wars and the economic depression of the first half of the 20th century." - Sir Nicholas Stern's report 

A RAFT of new green taxes on flights, cars and wasteful household appliances is being considered by ministers.

In a leaked (!!) letter to the Chancellor, David Miliband, the Environment Secretary, has proposed a package of environmental taxes meant to encourage people to use public transport, buy smaller cars and fly less. These include charges on petrol-guzzling cars, road pricing, a £5 levy on airline travel in Europe and £10 for longer-haul flights, and higher charges for dumping waste in landfills.

The proposals emerged on the eve of the publication of a 700-page report by the economist Sir Nicholas Stern, setting out the devastating economic impact of climate change.

Mr Miliband said the Stern report would show the country could no longer continue to pump carbon into the atmosphere without calculating the costs. "It has an environmental price and, as we are learning from Sir Nicholas Stern, it has an economic price as well," he said. "And for the future, we have to recognise that environmental and economic price of carbon emissions in the way we live and work."

Sir Nicholas's report will warn that Britain's economy will experience suffering on the scale of the 1930s Depression if the world's developed nations continue to resist the realities of climate change.

Costs could rise to £3.68 trillion within a decade, the report, commissioned by Gordon Brown, the Chancellor, will say.

The report is expected to set out three possible solutions: extending and linking emissions-trading schemes across the world; doubling the amount of funding for new energy technologies; and holding developed nations to their pledges on aid, as the poorest people will be hit worst by climate change.


Sounds like money in the (world) bank to me...

Quote:

The world needed to spend 1 per cent of its GDP, or £184 billion, to deal with climate change now, or face a bill up to 20 times higher within a decade. And rather than waiting for another five years to reach agreement on Kyoto targets, the protocol should be signed next year, according to Sir Nicholas's report.

"Our actions over the coming few decades could create risks of major disruption to economic and social activity, later in this century and in the next, on a scale similar to those associated with the great wars and the economic depression of the first half of the 20th century," he will say.

[...]

A spokesman for Mr Brown said he would consider the tax proposals, along with many other suggestions, ahead of next month's pre-Budget report. But with political opponents trying to out-muscle Labour on the environmental agenda, he is under pressure on the issue.

David Cameron, the Tory leader, turned up the heat, by saying he would be prepared to tax air travel. "We have said that we are going to raise the percentage of tax that comes from green taxes so we can actually rebalance the tax system," he said. "That's going to mean we've got to look at things like air transport, like the gas- guzzling cars. We'll come up with those ideas closer to a general election."

He also pledged to install solar panels and a wind turbine on the roof of No 10 if he was elected prime minister.

The Liberal Democrats, who were the first major party to promote green taxes, called for money collected that way to be repaid in income tax cuts.

Chris Huhne, the Lib Dems' environment spokesman, said: "The Chancellor must commit to a green guarantee that every penny piece raised in green taxes is handed back in income tax cuts. Green taxes must not be used as a stealth tax to raise government revenue."

Greenpeace said Sir Nicholas's report removed any doubt about the need for green taxes.

A spokesman said: "The scientific and moral case for acting on climate change has been sound for years - now the economic case is overwhelming. If we are to avert catastrophe, then there has to be a real cost to emitting carbon, and that means higher taxes on flying and gas- guzzlers. We owe it to future generations."

Sir Nicholas's report will conclude that the world does not have to choose between tackling climate change and economic growth - a view that clashes with the US president's claims that cutting emissions would cost jobs.

Today's report precedes United Nations climate talks, starting in Nairobi on 6 November, that will focus on finding a successor to Kyoto, which ends in 2012.

Tony Blair, the Prime Minister, is pushing for a post-Kyoto framework that would include the US - the world's biggest producer of greenhouse gases that cause climate change - as well as major developing countries such as China and India.

[...]

Tony Juniper, executive director of Friends of the Earth, said climate change was exacerbating existing problems in Africa.
"Unless we take genuine steps now to reduce our emissions, people in the developed world will be condemning millions to hunger, starvation and death," he said.
The coalition called for a "climate-proof" model of development and massive emissions cuts.

Research from the organisations - Oxfam, the New Economics Foundation and the Working Group on Climate Change and Development, an umbrella group of aid and green groups - said Africa faced new and dangerous extremes.
Global warming was set to worsen the continent's existing problems, said Andrew Simms from the New Economics Foundation.

"In the past year alone, 25 million people in sub-Saharan Africa have faced food crisis," he said. "Many dry areas are going to get drier and wet areas are going to get wetter. They are going to be caught between the devil of drought and the deep blue seas of floods."

He added that the "great tragedy" was that Africa had played virtually no role in global warming, a problem, he said, caused by economic activity of rich, industrial countries. Unless climate change was tackled, efforts to help Africa could come to nothing.

Massive greenhouse emissions cuts of 60 to 90 per cent would be needed to offset the damage, well in excess of the targets proposed by the 1997 Kyoto agreement.
Developed countries needed to spend up to £10.4 billion a year to help poor countries adapt to climate change, but had given only a tenth of the amount pledged.

Improved planning to reduce the risk from disaster, and agricultural practices that could withstand changing climates, could help mitigate the impact. The report comes two weeks before a key summit on climate change in Nairobi, where delegates will look at the progress made on the Kyoto agreement, which requires industrial nations to cut emissions by an average of 5.2 per cent from 1990 levels by 2008-12.
Delegates will also consider what system should be adopted when the current period ends.

The latest report was based on scientific research and evidence from those living on the front-line of global warming.
For millions of people in the Horn and east Africa, the success or failure of rains due over the next two months will be critical. Whether the rains fall will determine if 2007 will offer the prospect of recovery from the serious drought of 2005-6 or will be another year of desperate struggle to survive.

Duncan Green, head of research at Oxfam, said the study showed that climate change was an immediate problem for the poor in Africa, not simply a future threat.


From:
http://news.scotsman.com/politics.cfm?id=1601842006


Hmm. I wonder what it's gonna cost to 'save' Africa?

Quote:

Global warming cost: $7 trillion

LONDON: Failure by governments to take bold action against global warming in the next decade could cost the world up to 7 trillion dollars, a report warns.

Excerpts of a 700-page report to be released on Monday by Sir Nicholas Stern, a former World Bank chief economist, also show that rampant climate change could turn 200 million people into refugees amid drought or flood.

From:
http://www.dnaindia.com/report.asp?NewsID=1060914


Act now and save 7 Trillion dollars! Don't delay, as this is a limited time offer. Now, 7 trillion would be the cost to not 'fix' Africa. What's it gonna cost to do the job Sir Nick?

Not to simplify matters, but, couldn't the folks in the flood areas visit their friends in the drought areas and vice versa during the seasonal extremes? I mean, is this really such a pressing global crisis? Is it sensible to frantically throw trillion dollar aid packages together without a second look at the 'research data' or the long term effects of un-payable debts? Have we investigated all the possible solu-...

Quote:

Africa ‘faces catastrophe’ unless West acts on climate change

By James Hamilton

Africa will go “up in smoke” unless the international community acts to curb climate change.

[...]

From:
http://www.sundayherald.com/58762


Woah.....allright man, I get it... gnarly...well...
I'm smokin this one for Africa then...
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obeylittle



Joined: 10 Sep 2006
Posts: 442
Location: Middle o' Mitten, Michigan Corp. division of United States of America Corp. division of Global Corp.

PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2006 3:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like your media spin dissections Jerry, great humor too. Mr. Green
You nail it!!

And Fintan, I think we could call these games from the sidewalk outside the stadium. Most anyone can... so hows about a song:

CENTER FIELD (J.C. Fogerty)

Quote:
Well, beat the drum and hold the phone - the sun came out today!
We're born again, there's new grass on the field.
A-roundin' third, and headed for home, it's a brown-eyed handsome man;
Anyone can understand the way I feel.

Oh, put me in, Coach - I'm ready to play today;
Put me in, Coach - I'm ready to play today;
Look at me, I can be Centerfield.

Well, I spent some time in the Mudville Nine, watchin' it from the bench;
You know I took some lumps when the Mighty Casey struck out.
So Say Hey Willie, tell Ty Cobb and Joe DiMaggio;
Don't say "it ain't so", you know the time is now.

Oh, put me in, Coach - I'm ready to play today;
Put me in, Coach - I'm ready to play today;
Look at me, I can be Centerfield.

Yeah! I got it, I got it!

Got a beat-up glove, a homemade bat, and brand-new pair of shoes;
You know I think it's time to give this game a ride.
Just to hit the ball and touch 'em all - a moment in the sun;
(pop) It's gone and you can tell that one goodbye!


Oh, put me in, Coach - I'm ready to play today;
Put me in, Coach - I'm ready to play today;
Look at me, I can be Centerfield.

Oh, put me in, Coach - I'm ready to play today;
Put me in, Coach - I'm ready to play today;
Look at me, I can be Centerfield.
Yeah!
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EddieT



Joined: 28 Jun 2006
Posts: 477

PostPosted: Mon Dec 18, 2006 4:41 pm    Post subject: the latest from the washington post Reply with quote

Here's the latest from the Washington Post on Somalia...fresh with some Bush-bashing Democrats. The article ends on a lovely upswing though, just in case we were too caught up in blaming the Bush administration to remember that we are all fighting the same "East Africa...ummm...Al-Qaeda cell...errr...individuals?".


Quote:
U.S. sees growing threats in Somalia
Al-Qaeda’s influence, possible war with Ethiopia are concerns

By Karen DeYoung

Updated: 5:00 a.m. CT Dec 18, 2006
Six months ago, the Bush administration launched a new policy in war-torn Somalia, putting the State Department in charge after secret CIA efforts failed to prevent Islamic fundamentalists from seizing power in Mogadishu. It hoped that diplomacy would draw the Islamists into partnership with more palatable, U.S.-backed Somali leaders.

Today, that goal seems more distant than ever. Since coming to power in June, the Islamists have expanded their hold on the south. A largely powerless, U.S.-backed rump government remains divided and isolated in the southern town of Baidoa. U.S.-sponsored talks, and a separate Arab League effort, seem to be going nowhere.

Al-Qaeda, long hovering in the shadows, has established itself as a presence in the Somali capital, say U.S. officials, who see a growing risk that Somalia will become a new haven for terrorists to launch attacks beyond its borders.

Meanwhile, a major war -- promoted and greeted approvingly by Osama bin Laden -- looms between Somalia and Ethiopia, threatening a regional conflagration likely to draw more foreign extremists into the Horn of Africa.

Among administration officials, Congress, U.S. allies and other interested and fearful parties, there is a rising sense that Somalia is spinning rapidly out of control. But even as events there have focused Washington's attention, they have led to a wave of finger-pointing and a feeling that there are few good ideas and little time for turning the situation around.

A wide range of interviews and commentary last week provided assessments that differed only in their degree of bleakness and apportionment of blame.

"The Council of Islamic Courts is now controlled by . . .East Africa al-Qaeda cell individuals," Assistant Secretary of State for Africa Jendayi Frazer said of Mogadishu's new rulers.

Early hopes of a power-sharing deal with secular politicians have dissipated as Courts Chairman Hassan Dahir Aweys -- put on the U.S. terrorist list in 2001 as the head of a militant group accused of having links to al-Qaeda in the 1990s -- and Aden Ayrow, who heads the Courts' military arm, have increased their power.

Moderates remain within the Courts, a coalition of local Islamist groups and militias that drove CIA-supported warlords out of Mogadishu, Frazer said. But "they are not emerging as they could get their heads taken off, literally."

The Islamists have ignored U.S. insistence that they turn over three al-Qaeda operatives -- the core of what is called the East African cell -- who the administration says took refuge in Somalia after terrorist attacks in Africa, including the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.

In a taped statement released in July, bin Laden called on Somalis to begin preparing for regional war. He recalled the 1994 withdrawal of U.S. military forces after a warlord attack killed 18 U.S. troops, saying, "This time, victory will be far easier."

U.S. intelligence officials described the statement at the time as part of bin Laden's failing claim to the leadership of a worldwide Islamic movement, despite the dispersion of the al-Qaeda network by the U.S. terrorism fight. Now they are not so certain.

‘Not a lot of good options’
Still, the intelligence community is not prepared to fully endorse Frazer's conclusions about the level of al-Qaeda's control of the Courts. "I don't think there are hard and fast views," John D. Negroponte, the director of national intelligence, told Washington Post editors and reporters Thursday. Somalia "has come back on the radar screen only fairly recently," and the question is whether the Islamist government "is the next Taliban," he said. "I don't think I've seen a good answer."

But a U.S. counterterrorism official, while reluctant to dispute Negroponte's assessment, cited intelligence reporting that "people with links to al-Qaeda are assisting with training and weapons. It goes beyond just urging jihadists to take up arms."

"If the situation heats up," said the official, who was not authorized to discuss the issue on the record, "it could draw in more jihadists from abroad." Al-Qaeda, he said, "has a limited safe haven in Somalia, but given the current situation there's a concern that it could grow, including that it could be used as a springboard for launching terrorist operations outside Somalia."

"There are not a lot of good options right now," he said.

Events in Somalia could provide an immediate spark for a wider war in the Horn of Africa; the roots of such a conflict would be tangled in complicated, long-standing regional animosities. The United Nations reported last month that Ethiopia has sent thousands of troops to help prop up the two-year-old transitional government in Baidoa. The same report said Eritrea, whose 1970s war with Ethiopia is still smoldering over an unsettled border dispute, has deployed thousands of troops to train and fight alongside the Islamists. Arab neighbors and sympathizers are also reportedly providing funds.

Ethiopia, a Christian-dominated nation, also fought a war with Somalia in the 1970s, over the ethnic Somali and largely Muslim Ethiopian province of Ogaden.

Last week, Somali Islamists threatened a "major attack" if the Ethiopians do not withdraw by Tuesday. Ethiopia has said, in essence, bring it on.

Somalia descended into chaos after U.S. and U.N. troops withdrew in 1994, with warring clans competing for power and the rest of the world turning away. When the Islamist push began several years ago, the Bush administration started paying attention -- and funding locally unpopular warlords to gather intelligence and gird for battle.

‘A bad bet’

"By making a bad bet on the warlords to do our bidding," incoming Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Del.) charged last week, "the administration has managed to strengthen the Courts, weaken our position and leave no good options. This is one of the least-known but most dangerous developments in the world, and the administration lacks a credible strategy to deal with it."

The incoming chairman of the panel's Africa subcommittee, Sen. Russell D. Feingold (D-Wis.), who returned from talks with regional governments and U.S. military personnel in Africa last week, called the situation "dire" and said he will hold hearings in January.

Feingold complained to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice this summer that the administration lacked a "comprehensive strategy" and had not devoted high-level attention to the matter. It was an indirect critique of Frazer, left largely in charge of the issue, that is echoed by some U.S. allies and nongovernmental organizations in the region, who say she lacks the authority and skill to forge a diplomatic solution.

One senior European diplomat whose government closely consults with the Bush administration on Somalia concluded that "not much time has been given to this at the senior level." He said that he was told at the State Department that 75 percent of Rice's efforts were being spent on the Middle East and that he asked: "What does that leave for the rest of the world?" His government, he said, has urged the administration to work harder on uniting the Baidoa authority before sending it into negotiations with the Islamists.

John Prendergast of the International Crisis Group, who worked on Africa issues in the Clinton National Security Council and State Department, called the current administration's policy "idiotic." Tacit U.S. support for Ethiopia's military incursion has "incalculably strengthened" the Courts' appeal to Somali nationalism and "made our counterterrorism agenda nearly impossible to implement," he said.

A visit to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia's capital, this month by Gen. John P. Abizaid, head of the U.S. Central Command, sent the wrong signal to Somalis whose concern about Islamist power has been overshadowed by anti-Ethiopia fervor, Prendergast said. U.S. officials said Abizaid urged Ethiopian restraint.

The administration is not taking the criticism lying down. Even before the Courts' takeover of Mogadishu in June, Rice devoted "a good, long, two-hour session" to the subject and asked for "better options," State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said. The result was the formation of a "Somalia Contact Group" that has held talks among representatives of the Courts, the Baidoa government, other regional actors and U.S. representatives.

Early this month, the United States sponsored a U.N. Security Council resolution backing an all-African peacekeeping force -- excluding Ethiopia, Eritrea and other frontline states -- although no nation has made a commitment to send troops and funding is uncertain.

"Is the situation what we want it to be?" McCormack said. "No." But Rice "thinks we're doing the right things, and she hopes it will eventually bear fruit."

"I think this town wants to villainize someone for a hard problem," Frazer said in an interview. "So you're looking for the failure of something . . . a policy, an individual, U.S. interests. I think that's so unsophisticated, because what we have is a major challenge with not a lot of leverage at this moment in time. . . . Instead of recognizing the complexity of the situation, there is the tendency to say, 'Well, they're just wrong.' Some of that is frustration. Some of that is politics. And some of that is straight ignorance of the facts themselves."

© 2006 The Washington Post Company
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dilbert_g
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2006 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great post, Jerry, cracks me up.

Quote:
Al-Qaeda cell...errr...individuals?".


I didn't think an individual could take over a government. Must be Rambo Bin Laden.

Quote:
U.S. sees growing threats in Somalia


Well, Barnett also told his audience that Africa is the next big target, because it's like squeezing a balloon in the Middle East, Zawahiri and the terrorists try to go somewhere safer to regroup. So the US will be chasing them all over the world, like "Where's Waldo?" or some cartoon or TV show I can't think of the name of (Keystone Cops?) where the good guys chase the bad guys all over at high speed with sped up music playing.

It's ON the Table. They just have to sell it, and un-sell China.

As for Global Warming, I've heard the evidence that human-caused global warming is a bad data, leaves out the hyper-active SUN. All I know, it's +15° in Ohio. I could cloudbathe today.

Even if it WAS caused by human-factors, I've heard enough verifiable stuff here on suppressed energy technologies to have a headache. Or maybe that's the cigarette.
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dilbert_g
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2006 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This could probably go under some propaganda topic as well.

excerpt from Alex Constantine on Ratical
http://www.ratical.org/ratville/JFK/JohnJudge/linkscopy/CBD.html

Quote:
A glance that way is instructive. "Films," Heinrich Goebbels opined, constitute a "scientific means of influencing the masses," of molding attitudes, and he cautioned, "a government must not neglect them." Movies were central to the Nazi regime's domestic propaganda blitz. Under Nazi rule, some 1,300 movies were approved or commissioned by the Reich. Robert Hertzstein, a former consultant to the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations, notes in The War that Hitler Won that Goebbel's ministry salted popular films with repetitious words and symbols that stirred the emotions of the German populace: "heroism," "sacrifice," "mass murder," "hatred for Germany." (in Robert Edwin Herzstein, The War that Hitler Won: Goebbels and the Nazi Media Campaign, New York: Paragon, 1987, p. 272.) A half century later, Black Hawk Down -- with its profuse "heroism," "sacrifice," "mass murder," "hatred for America" -- swept the next bellicose right-wing "homeland." The parallels were glaring.

And obnoxious. Brendon Sexton (an actor in the film), speaking at an anti-war forum held at Columbia University, recalled that in preparation for his role, he and a fellow actor flew to Georgia for `Ranger Orientation Training' at Fort Benning in Columbus. From Atlanta, they shuttled to the training site and "on our flight there were a bunch of guys with Marine haircuts speaking Spanish. It took us a few moments to realize these guys were `students' of the School of the Americas, the U.S. Army's own terrorist training camp in Latin America." This experience "put things into perspective: warlords, dictators and terrorists are normally okay with the U.S., as long as they do the bidding of U.S. corporate interests." ("What's wrong with Black Hawk Down? -- Black Hawk Down Actor Brendan Sexton on what really happened in Somalia," Z-Magazine Web Site, http://www.zmag.org/ZNET.htm)

Those interests lurked beyond Ridley Scott's klieg lights in geopolitical obscurity. Throughout the 1970s and '80s, Somalia was ruled by the decrepit Mohamed Siad Barre. Bowing to the dictates of American Oil, President Barre crushed all dissent. He leased nearly two-thirds of oil-rich Somalia to four American petroleum companies: Chevron, Conoco, Phillips and Amoco. Somalia, a tiny country in the Horn of Africa, is also of interest to the U.S., a direct route to the Red Sea and the Suez Canal. Barre was overthrown in 1991, Somalia erupted in turmoil and the oil companies' land contracts were rendered useless paper. At the same time, there was no shortage of misery in the world. A military adventure to Somalia would have appeared whimsical. Citing famine in Mogadishu and the South, President George Bush, Sr. let the dogs out. The Los Angeles Times noted that Bush's envoy during the operation made the Conoco compound his base. ("Black Hawk Down: Shoot first, don't ask questions afterwards," Independent, 2-2-02)

On May 7, 1993 Canadian newspapers reported that Airborne Commandos had torture-murdered a Somali teenager. Then came subsequent news of murders by Canada's peacekeepers. As many as 1,000 civilians (or "Skinnies"s) were massacred by American troops sent to "restore order" and grab Barre's successor, Mohammed Aideed. Colin Powell, then head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, described the military operations in Somalia as "a paid political advertisement" for the Pentagon. (Michael L. Tan, "Only a Movie," INQ7, Philippine news web site, http://www.inq7.net/opi/2002/feb/26/opi_mltan-1.htm.)
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MichaelC



Joined: 06 Jul 2006
Posts: 2397

PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The WALL STREET JOURNAL EUROPE continues it's relentless campaign of lies to keep the "African AID$ Epidemic" on everyone's front page with a 2 page horror story in this weekend's edition....
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